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Dyshidrosis

Help! I've recently discovered that I have dyshidrosis on my hands and elbows - it's driving me batty, and I was wondering if there were any natural remedies to calm it down? It's kind of unsightly at times, and I try not to let it bother me, but I do get people asking 'what's wrong with your hands?'. I would LOVE any natural, easy remedies to help with it, even if it just relieves the itching and pain...

Many thanks in advance! =D

[Edit:] just thought I'd add a description of dyshidrosis; it's a type of eczema on the hands and feet characterized by very small, clear-liquid filled blisters that are flush with the skin or slightly above - hence, they're very deep. As I've discovered, sometimes they itch, burn and HURT, and if you pick or scratch at them, they ooze a clear fluid and take absolutely ages to heal, turn red, and start flaking. As far as I know, the cause is unknown...but help would be appreciated nonetheless!

[EDIT2:] WOW! Thanks so much for all the help that everyone has given me! This is phenomenal, and I'm so glad I helped people by asking the question! This community is so friendly. I never expected this many replies! I'm just stunned, haha. Thanks so much! I'll reply individually as well, but I just wanted to say a big thank you to everyone. =D

Comments

( 27 comments — Leave a comment )
verdianna
Feb. 11th, 2008 10:15 pm (UTC)
I had it as well as regular eczema
Really fixing it is more about not eating whatever your body is intolerant to and avoiding all chemicals including handsoaps in public places. and a the last peice is getting nutrients your body is missing these are ussually fat related often times evening primrose Oil goes a long way to healing the last thing id say avoid all petrolium prodicts and things with fragrances.
there are lots of nautural creams that help to aleviate the symptoms but it wont fix it. for me going dairy free eliminated the patches that I had for over 10 years. I didnt have it all the time for that period but would get stress related outbreaks and i had it instead of the normal acne that teens get
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 01:51 pm (UTC)
I know I'm lactose intolerant, but I still eat cheese. I drink lactose-free milk, at least, but my whole family are cheese-fanatics. oops.
I avoid things with fragrances anyway because it irritates my skin at the best of times, and my asthma has a tough time with heavily-perfumed things.
I will definitely try adding things like evening primrose oil and checking out dietary issues, thanks so much!
verdianna
Feb. 12th, 2008 09:12 pm (UTC)
Yea i always avoiuded too much dairy but when I was living with a freind who is severly casein allergic I was cooking for hr too so Iread all my ingredients and had nothing with any dairy products for 3 months thats when my skin totally cleared.
turggle
Feb. 11th, 2008 10:27 pm (UTC)
Holy crap! Thanks for posting this! I have these! Had them for years and years and I never found out what they were... well, until now.

I have discovered that once they are there, the fastest way to get rid of them is to not scratch (they spread) and to use clear calamine lotion like hand lotion. I also use Aveeno anti-itch creme and soak my hands in warm water and a few scoops of cooked oatmeal. But I don't know how to prevent them.

Once I had it so bad that my fingers wouldn't bend because every inch of my hands was covered with them.

I have noticed that I tend to get them more when I am stressed or sick. I almost always can find one at all times, but they seem to increase when my immune system is down and around my period.

Things I have tried that have NOT helped are: vasaline, blister treatments, salcyclic acid, sunlight, ice packs, heat pads, non-oatmeal hand lotions, washing more frequently, using hand sanitizers, and about everyother thing I could think of. None of them worked.

Thanks again for posting this! I am so going onto google right now!
neko_loliighoul
Feb. 12th, 2008 05:39 am (UTC)
dude, me too!
unfortunately ithink they are caused by the dishsoap we use to clean the bar where i work ( i'm a bar tender) and/or the disinfectant we soak the cloths in... a little hard to avoid but i guess i can use gloves...they arent obvious just annoying/itchy D:

i might try the oatmeal thing, it works on my other, regular eczema ( brought on by soaps and most laundry powders -bleh)
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 01:57 pm (UTC)
Hahaha, glad I could help! I saw these things and was like, the hell is this? and googled it to find out. Google is amazing fun, as is Wikipedia, haha.
I am an obsessive scratcher/picker. This is driving me mad, because I really, really want to pick at them, and know I shouldn't!
Oatmeal? That sounds promising and soothing. I will definitely try that one. That sounds really nice, actually.
I was super stressed last week, and that's when I started getting them. Probably a link!
Thanks for the suggestions and info!
walklikethunder
Feb. 11th, 2008 10:50 pm (UTC)
I know that eliminating or cutting back on refined sugars helps regular eczema... maybe that would be something to look into?
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:15 pm (UTC)
ooh, that's a good idea! I'm not entirely sure what consitutes 'refined' sugar, but that's what google is for. =D
thanks!
sybbis
Feb. 11th, 2008 11:46 pm (UTC)
I got something similar to this once. I somehow managed to transfer the athlete's foot I picked up at camp to my hands, and I got all these little *horribly* painful and itchy blisters because I'm allergic to it. If you haven't already ruled out fungal infection, you might try some of the things generally known to work on those. (I've heard tea tree oil, not sure what else.) Not having cared much for natural healing at the time (well, I was 15) I just put athlete's foot cream on them at night and it went away eventually.
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:17 pm (UTC)
I haven't ruled out a fungal infection, so thanks for the suggestion! I'll check the memories. =D
caliza
Feb. 11th, 2008 11:46 pm (UTC)
Wow...I did a google search on this, since I wasn't familier with the term, and I think I have this too, just never had a name fo rit..it tends to get aggrevated in the cold dry winter months...I'll be watching here to see waht suggestions you get...
purrsikat
Feb. 11th, 2008 11:48 pm (UTC)
Traditional Chinese Medicine? As a child I was taken to a Chinese Herbalist & after 2 days of taking the concoction I had fingerprints for the first time since the day after I was born (I was about 3 or 4 years old at the time I think). (*edited* to say that I didn't have fingerprints due to eczema)

Best of luck, I hope you can find something to alleviate your dyshidrosis..

Edited at 2008-02-11 11:50 pm (UTC)
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:22 pm (UTC)
I'll do a google search on that - I've found Chinese medicine to be interesting before, and anything that's lasted for so long in history is bound to work.
thanks! it's always good to have different solutions. =D
vivapink
Feb. 12th, 2008 12:25 am (UTC)
I have that on my hands as well. The worst is when I get it on the sides of 2 adjacent fingers and they rub together. Miserable!

As someone else said, don't scratch it. The bumps stop flaring and go away if they aren't bothered, but once they ooze, it spreads. Sleeping in gloves and using ice when they are flaring helps some. Maintenance is very important as well. Use very gentle soaps, which may mean carrying a bottle of soap with you for public handwashing. Use very pure oils to moisturize the skin; I've had success with shea butter and coconut oil. They don't cure it, but they don't make it worse either, which is just as important.

An elimination diet may or may not help - doesn't hurt to try. Get plenty of essential fats in your diet - take fish or flaxseed oil, add flaxseed meal to your foods, eat nuts, etc.

Other tips: Wear gloves when you go out in the cold. Use laundry detergent that doesn't irritate you. Use the most gentle toiletries possible. Avoid keeping your hands wet for long periods of time, such as washing dishes, but be aware that using latex gloves may irritate your hands too if you're sensitive.

If nothing works and you simply cannot stand it, there's no shame in using prescription steroid creams. I desperately wanted to avoid them, but after spending last winter with no skin on the knuckles of my 2 middle fingers (that was fun to show off), I caved. I use it when I have flare ups that need healing and then maintain it with the things I mentioned above.

I can't pinpoint one thing that worked to get it under control, but I do know that stressful situations cause flareups for me and I find myself scratching before I know it. Staying as healthy and stress-free chemical-free as possible can only help. I hope you are able to get it under control soon.
ladymiao
Feb. 12th, 2008 05:56 am (UTC)
I agree with no shame about using a 'script. I had a really bad flare up at one point that started on my feet. I tried everything I could think of, then it spread to my hands (I'm a massage therapist!). I finally caved and got a prescription for fluocinonide that knocked it out in a few days.
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:28 pm (UTC)
I hate having things you aren't supposed to scratch, because then I always want to scratch more, haha. The temptation of the forbidden.
I can't use coconut oil, unfortunately; my mother is allergic to all things nut, including the smells. Anaphylaxic shock is not a fun thing.
I'll try taking more essential fats, but unfortunately, the nut thing again - I haven't eaten nuts or anything nut-related for around 5 years now. They're healthy, I know, but even breathing near my mother after I've eaten nuts make her have a reaction.
I will wear gloves, I should do that more anyway. I have some prescription creams hanging around the house, so I'll probably try the quick-fix at some point and use them. Not natural in the least, but...everyone caves in at some point.

Thanks so much for all the tips, I really appreciate it!
anubika
Feb. 12th, 2008 03:20 am (UTC)
I am really quite shocked to read that several other people have this, other than myself and my brother (yeah read somewhere its hereditary)

not much is really known about it, except that its one of the oldest recorded ailments, also read that what COULD cause it or aggravate it is:

stress
season change
zinc
cobalt

also can target the bottom of the feet, I couldn't imagine that with the cracking and pain I get when the skin gets thick from them... grr

Hope you find some peace!

other than that I have actually haven't had a case in a while (yay) don't know what I am doing right
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:31 pm (UTC)
I read about the metal allergy thing, but I don't really know where I'd be coming in contact with them or how to avoid them. =/
Stress, I can definitely identify with. I haven't had them on the bottom of my feet yet, thankfully, and I hope I won't.
Thanks, I just kinda hope they'll settle down by themselves before I have to use a prescription cream!
verdianna
Feb. 12th, 2008 09:22 pm (UTC)
been ther had it on the bottom of my feet but it really was easier to treat as they were less exposed and you dont wash your feet every couple of hours and the lotions stay put
freyaw
Feb. 12th, 2008 04:42 am (UTC)
I've found over the years that mine are generally triggered by my wearing bandaids (in combination with stress, diet oopsies, and other triggering factors, but almost never without the bandaids). That's bandaids anywhere not just where the lumps appear.
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:32 pm (UTC)
...Oops. I'm wearing a bandaid on a few blisters right now.
haha, whoopsies.
Thanks!
freyaw
Feb. 12th, 2008 11:27 pm (UTC)
If you're a big itcher, putting giant bandaids, or taping gauze over them will help you not pop them open. It's a question as to whether you react to the glue or antiseptic (like me and my mum) and if you do, whether having the barrier between you and the skin to prevent damage is worth it.

When I've had them on my feet, I've worn socks to bed to prevent me scratching in my sleep
face_furniture
Feb. 12th, 2008 12:52 pm (UTC)
Wow, I have this too but never had a name for it, fortunately fairly mild but it flares up every couple of months. I use topical witch hazel gel to treat open sores (which is very drying) and a good moisturiser to try and stop the skin drying out and getting really scaly. If it gets really bad a honey mask on my hands helps too, but its kind of messy.
inutsuki
Feb. 12th, 2008 06:33 pm (UTC)
witch hazel sounds like a great idea! I'll see if I can't get my hands on some.
Thanks!
face_furniture
Feb. 12th, 2008 07:00 pm (UTC)
It stings, but it works.
shortchick4life
Jun. 15th, 2008 07:47 am (UTC)
Further Questioning this...
I have had this on my hands for years, and found it gets worse in HEAT... however, I have very VERY itchy skin when it comes to my feet and now my hands when I have these break outs... I now have the bumps on the bottom of my feet and I am wondering if it started as dyshidrosis on my hands and althelets foot on my feet and I spread them to the other. Is that possible? Also, I just wanted to know out of all these suggestions... which they all seem to be good... which one actually worked! I broke one on the bottom of my foot and it fricken hurts! Also, my hands are split open right at the first knuckle bend... I work in a restuarant and am constantly stickin my hands in a variety of things then washing them... I need to check with the owner 2morrow if the soap we use is anti-bacterial. (Which by the way, is also BAD for your immune system) Tomorrow is my last day of work for 6 weeks... Anyone got any suggestions for what to do to (best) treat my hands in this time period? Thanks! ~ SJ
shortchick4life
Jun. 15th, 2008 07:48 am (UTC)
Re: Further Questioning this...
Also, one more question... I know if you break them, it spreads... but can you spread it to other people?
( 27 comments — Leave a comment )

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