Previous Entry | Next Entry

Bay leaves for repelling cockroaches

Has anyone here had luck repelling cockroaches with bay leaves?

We keep seeing them (we are in the inner city) and the landlord just keeps wanting to spray - we have cleaned up all the possible "hot spots", etc etc., but I see them and they really freak me out (Me screaming and then yelling "mother f-er" is now code word for "OMG THERE'S A COCKROACH"), so I'd like to juts do what I can to keep them away. 

I can buy a half pound of bay leaves on ebay for pretty cheap, and I figured that that will be a *lot* of bay leaves. Does anyone else have any other tips or suggestions at repelling them? I already use boric acid and borax.

Comments

( 12 comments — Leave a comment )
starcrossedlady
Jul. 5th, 2009 07:30 pm (UTC)
haven't tried bay leaves, but boy, do I feel your pain :( My codeword is an inarticulate scream.

what I've been doing is getting these glue boxtraps from a company called Victor. They are poison-free, so you can put them wherever, and they trap the suckers inside so you throw them out. I can only get them from OSH, but you might have better luck.
burntbuffalo
Jul. 5th, 2009 07:54 pm (UTC)
I have a few essential oils I drop around to keep them away. I use citronella, peppermint, rosemary, and clove bud oils. They work well, especially the rosemary and citronella.
indigodye
Jul. 5th, 2009 07:57 pm (UTC)
Do you just spread it in problem areas, or is there another way you apply it?
blacksambuca
Jul. 5th, 2009 11:33 pm (UTC)
If you have any cats/other animals, you probably shouldn't use essential oils near the floor, or anywhere they could access. Cats in particular have sensitive livers and essential oils very bad for them.
burntbuffalo
Jul. 6th, 2009 03:17 am (UTC)
I drop it in problem areas especially, but also around base boards or back splashes and doors and windows. And backs of drawers and cupboards, especially if I've seen bugs or droppings. And I'll sometimes put it around drains at night before bed, but I don't know if that does anything or not.
rainbowthespian
Jul. 5th, 2009 08:00 pm (UTC)
we had bay leaves strewn in the drawers and they seemed to work pretty well for a while then got stale, but knowing us that was like a year and we hadn't noticed time go by...
permavultur
Jul. 5th, 2009 08:18 pm (UTC)
I was reading The Herbal Kitchen yesterday and came across a culinary warning between the traditional bay laurel leaf (mild and suitable for cooking) and the California bay (ten times stronger and counterindicated for fine flavor). If you go with California bay, look for their non-serrated, narrow leaves. Hope this info helps you on the right track.
sadraele
Jul. 5th, 2009 09:39 pm (UTC)
be sure to mix your boric acid. 1 part boric acid, 1 part cornmeal, 1 part powdered sugar. the poison alone they'll avoid. the poison + food source will get them to eat then die.
christinaianity
Jul. 6th, 2009 01:49 am (UTC)
ooohh good tip, ive been using straight boric acid and that works pretty well. but, sugar! ooo.
ursy_ten
Jul. 5th, 2009 11:28 pm (UTC)
Pandanus amaryllifolius repels cockroaches. It's used widely in Asian cooking and imparts a wonderful aroma to rice. You can usually get the plant in Asia supermarkets, and also on Ebay sometimes. Failing that, you can get a bunch of the leaves in the freezer area of some Asian supermarkets.

If you live in a tropical area, great - they don't like the cold. If not, keep it in a pot and bring it indoors/under cover in Winter. Water very sparingly in cold weather - treat like a cactus etc. and water the soil only (if the crown gets wet, it will rot). In very hot weather, you can go nuts with the water, it'll thrive.

They only release their scent when the leaves are cut and drying out, so what many do is place a bundle of the cut leaves in their pantry (or wherever) to repel the cockroaches. The smell is delightful, kinda nutty and reminiscent (of course) of many asian foods, as it's the East's version of vanilla - they use it for lots of things.

You might need a few plants for a constant supply of leaves.

Here's a little more info, but there's heaps more out there if you google it.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080708035346AALMTqJ
skyfiery
Jul. 6th, 2009 12:44 am (UTC)
Seconding the pandan plant. It's used pretty effectively in repelling roaches, but you'll have to clear them every two weeks or so when the leaves dry out the loose their effectiveness. But they're pretty cheap. So it should be okay.
ethnographic
Jul. 6th, 2009 01:07 pm (UTC)
Maybe we just have super resistant NYC roaches, but I literally opened a cabinet to find roaches crawling on the bay leaves. We used boric acid and now we rarely see any--how long did you give the boric acid to work? It took about a week before we saw results.
( 12 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

October 2014
S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Golly Kim